Distance Decay

is a geographical term which describes the effect of distance on cultural or spatial interactions. The distance decay effect states that the interaction between two locations declines as the distance between them increases. Once the distance is outside of the two locales activity space their interactions begin to decrease.
-As objects get further apart, there is less integration.
-Distance makes it more difficult to do trade, communicate, and maintain cultural connections.
-Opposite of time-space compression.

Related terms include "friction of distance," -It is easier to go to nearer places.

Distance decay is when the interaction between the two places increases. For example, imagine putting a magnet on your desk and putting an iron nail on it. The farther you pull the iron nail away from the magnet, the less of a pull effect the magnet has on the nail. It’s the same with distance decay; as the distance between two entities increases, the effect of their interaction decreases.



Time-space compression

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Refers to technologies that seem to accelerate or elide spatial and temporal distances, including technologies of communication (telegraph, telephones, fax machines, Internet), travel (rail, cars, trains, jets) and economics (the need to overcome spatial barriers, open up new markets, speed up production cycles, and reduce the turn-over time of capital).

  • The process of coming closer together and more in contact with each other, even though the real distance remains the same.
  • Time- space compression is reducing perceived distance, which is the friction of distance thought by humans not the actual distance on the land.
  • Time-space compression often refers to technologies that seem to accelerate or elide spatial and temporal distances, including technologies of communication, travel and economics.

-The effect of distance seeming to be less and less important.
-So despite long distances, people interact and communicate, trade happens and cultures influence each other.
-Technology makes this happen so areas of less development often do not experience time-space compression.


Examples of time-space compression technologies, travel, and economics:
* Telegraph, Telephone, Fax Machine, Internet
* Rail, Cars, Trains, Jets
* The need to overcome spatial barriers, open up new markets, speed up production cycles, and reduce the turnover time
*Internet, containerization, and cell phones are the best of the recent examples